Close-up Of A Tired Businessman

While misery on the job can seem insurmountable at times, breaking down what you can control — and therefore change — can go a long way toward improving your happiness at work before it gets worse.

“The biggest problem comes from disengagement,” said Anne Marie Segal, founder of Segal Coaching in Stamford, Connecticut. “Employees will feel unsatisfied and start to separate their goals from the company’s, and then start to ask, ‘Why am I here?'”

– By Sarah O’Brien, special reporter for CNBC’s personal finance team

To read more at CNBC.com, click here.

Image above: Adobe Stock.

 

Thanks to those who attended my webinar today on 20 Top Resume Challenges. In this short half-hour course, I give you an overview of the major points you need to know to write a modern resume.

Here is the replay, and the slide deck and related Forbes article are referenced in the YouTube description.

Stop fighting. Start writing!

Image credit: Adobe Image

Red plastic shovel with black handle stuck in fluffy snow.

Here’s a quick thought about snow days from a career coach and mom, as the East Coast is being pummeled by Blizzard 2017, the snowmaggedon or whatever we are calling it today.

As a snow day gives you time to reflect on what you want for your life and career and (for many of us) what you want to pass on to the next generation, I was thankful for the snow.

My son took the snow blower and cleared the driveway this afternoon, which shows grit. He doesn’t always have grit. In fact, as a talented yet distractable boy, it is a key skill that we know he will need to build over time, as it does not come naturally to him. So we try to create situations that require grit but will not overwhelm him, so he will be motivated to push forward.

Grit is as old as time and has become the new power skill, as it is needed in just about every life situation. Here’s some more about instilling grit in children and educating students about grit:

The Carnegie Foundation

The Atlantic

NPR

I think often about how we build grit as a world and within our own families. In particular, what can we do to help children appreciate the skills they need to serve as leaders in the future and “show up” the right way to succeed? Today, the answer fell from the sky.

Snow Day Grit - Snow Blower

Anne Marie Segal is a career and leadership development coach, author, resume strategist and member of Forbes Coaches Council. She is founder of Segal Coaching, author of Master the Interview: A Guide for Working Professionals (available on Amazon.com) and a frequent public speaker in New York, Connecticut and beyond.

First image above: Adobe Images.
Second image copyright 2017 Anne Marie Segal. All rights reserved.

 

 

Eco concept

Jake worked for five years as a transactional attorney and then turned to real estate, managing his family’s portfolio of rental properties. From there, he launched a third career as an artist, painting large-scale murals for corporate offices and collectors.

As an executive coach, I have a front row seat to major professional transitions of brave souls such as Jake. Clients often ask for a roadmap to make such a change of their own, whether they yearn for more meaning at work or have other motivations. While I can ask the right questions to uncover their passions and talents and how these intersect with the marketplace, paths taken vary widely and can be entirely unexpected.

Please click on the image of the caterpillar below for the link to the rest of this article, originally published on Forbes.com.

Monarch Butterfly Caterpillar On Milkweed

Anne Marie Segal is a career and leadership development coach, author, resume strategist and member of Forbes Coaches Council. She is founder of Segal Coaching, author of Master the Interview: A Guide for Working Professionals (available on Amazon.com) and a frequent public speaker in New York, Connecticut and beyond.

Image credit: Adobe Images.

Through my work as an Advisor to the The Resume Exchange, a career development resource for University of Chicago students and alumni, I met Daniel Arking, its tireless Founder and chief Advisor.

Here’s a link to my recent interview with Dan about my new book, Master the Interview: A Guide for Working Professionals.

Click here for the link to the Resume Exchange Interview

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Look for the obvious – and beyond. (Adobe Images)

In my new book, Master the Interview, I discuss the importance of recognizing the questions “behind the questions.” If you want results in your job interviews, this is a crucial point.

As I mentioned in my prior post, there are the questions that your interviewer asks, and there are often other questions that he/she really wants answered:

Interviewers ask other questions – such as “what is your ideal job?” – that approximate what they want to discover about the candidate, knowing that many of these questions are poor proxies for what they really want to know yet hoping that the questions they do ask get them there.

When interviewers ask “how you overcame a setback in your professional career,” for example, they are asking for about problem-solving skills and resilience. 

As you are preparing for an interview, don’t miss the obvious points. At the same time, look behind the obvious. Instead of simply reacting quickly to a question asked – with all of your adrenalin pumping and your mind on high alert – take a mental step back (a quick one, truth be told) and allow the underlying theme of the question to sink in. Then, you will know that your answer is not only authentic, but also relevant to the job.

If you can not only answer the question asked but also address the underlying theme of the question, you set yourself up for job interview success.

Please follow up for more details at my prior post.

Anne Marie Segal is a career and leadership coach, author and resume writer for attorneys, executives and entrepreneurs. Her new book, Master the Interview, is available on Amazon.com. For more information about Anne Marie’s coaching and resume writing work or to request a potential speaking engagement in the New York area, please visit www.segalcoaching.com.

 

 

mature business man on a desk, isolated on white

Do you know the underlying interview questions? Image Credit: Adobe Images

A smart interviewer is not chiefly concerned that you “walk him/her through your resume” or the exact answer to “what are your weaknesses?” or other questions that are commonly asked in the interview process. For many jobs, your interviewer really wants to know the following (or some version of it):

  • Can you do the job?

  • Are you a good fit?
  • Will you make my life easier?
  • Will you solve the problems I really need solved?
  • Will you make or save the company “real money?”
  • Can you extrapolate and analogize, or will you waste time and resources (mine and others) because you don’t know how to think for yourself?
  • Will you anticipate issues before they arise and figure out how to fix them?
  • Will you know how to communicate in a way that people understand (especially me) and on a timely basis?
  • Can I put you in front of my SVP, EVP, CEO, Board of Directors and/or clients, if and when the time comes?
  • Can you grow over time if/when our needs progress?
  • Will you have the resilience to charge through the inevitable setbacks that arise in any job and specifically in the environment in which we operate?
  • Are you able to manage stress (your own and others) in a positive way?
  • Will you make me regret hiring you one day?
  • Will you quit in three months?
  • Will you bail when there’s a crucial deadline?
  • Will you understand and care about what we are trying to achieve?
  • Will you get things done?
  • Can I afford you?
  • Why should I (take a risk and) hire you?

 Of course, most of the questions above are not standard interview fare in most (if not all) roles. Imagine an interviewer saying:

“I have just one question:

Will you make my life easier and by how much?
$150,000 a year easier? Sold! When can you start?”

Skilled interviewers have a dilemma, in other words. They know that if they asked the above questions directly, the answer to most of them would be an emphatic yes or no, as applicable. Easy peasy, as the phrase goes. Any job seeker could give the right answers to sail through an interview like that, so there is no point in asking. So interviewers ask other questions – such as “what is your ideal job?” – that approximate what they want to discover about the candidate, knowing that many of these questions are poor proxies for what they really want to know yet hoping that the questions they do ask get them there.

As a job candidate, the above questions (i.e., the ones a skilled interview would ask, if he/she could) are helpful to keep front of mind. Why? Because these underlying concerns, will help you recognize what you must demonstrate and address to be hired.

When interviewers ask “how you overcame a setback in your professional career,” for example, they are asking for about problem-solving skills and resilience. Any details that you give about the situation should demonstrate those two factors. At the same time, you should be careful that your answer does not demonstrate a propensity to blame others or reveal company or individual confidences, both of which are potential red flags that will peak the ears of an interviewer and damage your candidacy.

The last question from the above list is really the deciding one in any job interview: why should I hire you? I tell my interview preparation clients that every answer they give in an interview should answer this underlying question:

Why should I hire you?

If you know and can internalize that “why should I hire you?” is the underlying question behind all other interview questions, you have a huge advantage in the interview process. You won’t be tempted to go off on a tangent or give the “wrong” response, because you will always gear your answer to what the interviewer really wants to know: the benefits you can bring to the target company.

Anne Marie Segal is a career and leadership coach, writer and resume writer for attorneys, executives and entrepreneurs. The above is an excerpt from her new book, Master the Interview, which is forthcoming on Amazon.com in mid-October 2016. For more information about Anne Marie’s coaching and resume writing work, please visit www.segalcoaching.com.

 

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